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Why We Need Skin Cancer Check?

Skin Cancer Facts & Stats

Australia is the skin cancer capital of the world. More than 11,500 Australian men and women are diagnosed with a melanoma each year, and an estimated 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers. Skin cancer accounts for over 80% of all new cases of cancer diagnosed in Australia each year.

Luckily, skin cancer is almost entirely preventable and high-profile awareness and information campaigns telling Australians how to save their skin have been in place for several decades. But there are still a lot of misconceptions about skin cancer and sun protection.
For more information visit Skin Cancer Statistics and Issues.

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Why We Need Skin Cancer Check?

Skin Cancer Facts & Stats

Australia is the skin cancer capital of the world. More than 11,500 Australian men and women are diagnosed with a melanoma each year, and an estimated 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma1 skin cancers. Skin cancer accounts for over 80% of all new cases of cancer diagnosed in Australia each year.

Luckily, skin cancer is almost entirely preventable and high-profile awareness and information campaigns telling Australians how to save their skin have been in place for several decades. But there are still a lot of misconceptions about skin cancer and sun protection.
For more information visit Skin Cancer Statistics and Issues.

Book An Appointment Today

What are some risk factors of Skin Cancer?

People at an increased and high risk for skin cancer include those with:
• Fair skin, a tendency to burn rather than tan, freckles, light eye colour, light or red hair colour;
• Increased numbers of unusual moles (dysplastic naevi);
• Depressed immune systems (risk factor for SCC);
• A family history of melanoma in a first degree relative and
• Previous melanoma

Protection

Sunscreen

Cancer Council recommends using sunscreen that is:

  • sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30
  • broad-spectrum (which protects against both UVA and UVB radiation as both can cause cancer)
  • water-resistant.

Use a combination of sun protection measures and never rely on just one:

  • Seek Make use of any available shade, stroller or play area. Consider using a cover for the car windows.
  • Slip on clothing that covers as much of the body’s skin as possible.
  • Slap on a broad-brimmed, bucket or legionnaire style hat so the face, neck and ears are protected.
  • Slop on sunscreen. The widespread use of sunscreen on body should be applied 15–20 minutes before going outside. To help ensure it is effective sunscreen should be reapplied every two hours, or more often if it has been wiped or washed off.
  • Slide on some sunglasses, if practical, to protect the eyes. Look for sunglasses that are labelled AS/NZS 1067:2016 and are a close fitting, wrap-around style that covers as much of the eye area as possible.
  • Fake tans : Users of fake tanning products should continue to protect their skin when the UV Index is 3 and above by

What are some risk factors of Skin Cancer?

People at an increased and high risk for skin cancer include those with:
• Fair skin, a tendency to burn rather than tan, freckles, light eye colour, light or red hair colour;
• Increased numbers of unusual moles (dysplastic naevi);
• Depressed immune systems (risk factor for SCC);
• A family history of melanoma in a first degree relative and
• Previous melanoma

Protection

Sunscreen

Cancer Council recommends using sunscreen that is:

  • sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30
  • broad-spectrum (which protects against both UVA and UVB radiation as both can cause cancer)
  • water-resistant.

Use a combination of sun protection measures and never rely on just one:

  • Seek Make use of any available shade, stroller or play area. Consider using a cover for the car windows.
  • Slipon clothing that covers as much of the body’s skin as possible.
  • Slapon a broad-brimmed, bucket or legionnaire style hat so the face, neck and ears are protected.
  • Slopon sunscreen. The widespread use of sunscreen on body should be applied 15–20 minutes before going outside. To help ensure it is effective sunscreen should be reapplied every two hours, or more often if it has been wiped or washed off.
  • Slideon some sunglasses, if practical, to protect the eyes. Look for sunglasses that are labelled AS/NZS 1067:2016 and are a close fitting, wrap-around style that covers as much of the eye area as possible.
  • Fake tans : Users of fake tanning products should continue to protect their skin when the UV Index is 3 and above by

You need to see your doctor as soon as possible if,

• New moles.
• Moles that increases in size.
• An outline of a mole that becomes notched.
• A spot that changes colour from brown to black or is varied.
• A spot that becomes raised or develops a lump within it.
• The surface of a mole becoming rough, scaly or ulcerated.
• Moles that itch or tingle.
• Moles that bleed or weep.
• Spots that look different from the others.

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ABCDE Skin cancer detection guide

A is for Asymmetry

Look for spots that lack symmetry. That is, if a line was drawn through the middle, the two sides would not match up.

B is for Border

A spot with a spreading or irregular edge (notched).

C is for Colour

Blotchy spots with a number of colours such as black, blue, red, white and/or grey.

D is for Diameter

Look for spots that are getting bigger.

E is for Evolving

Spots that are changing and growing.

You need to see your doctor as soon as possible if,

• New moles.
• Moles that increases in size.
• An outline of a mole that becomes notched.
• A spot that changes colour from brown to black or is varied.
• A spot that becomes raised or develops a lump within it.
• The surface of a mole becoming rough, scaly or ulcerated.
• Moles that itch or tingle.
• Moles that bleed or weep.
• Spots that look different from the others.

Contact Us
Book Online

ABCDE Skin cancer detection guide

A is for Asymmetry

Look for spots that lack symmetry. That is, if a line was drawn through the middle, the two sides would not match up.

B is for Border

A spot with a spreading or irregular edge (notched).

C is for Colour

Blotchy spots with a number of colours such as black, blue, red, white and/or grey.

D is for Diameter

Look for spots that are getting bigger.

E is for Evolving

Spots that are changing and growing.

Sun Protection and Infants (0-12 Months):

To protect babies from solar UV, Cancer Council Australia recommends using a combination of sun protection measures whenever UV Index levels reach 3 or above as shown by the daily sun protection times.

Sun blocks are not recommended for this age group.

Plan daily activities to ensure the baby is well protected from the sun. Aim to minimise time (or take particular care) outside during the middle hours of the day during the summer period when UV levels are at their strongest. These vary depending on your location in Australia, so checking the UV index is recommended.

Children often copy those around them and learn by imitation. Research shows that if adults adopt sun protection behaviours, the children in their care are more likely to do the same.

Check the baby’s clothing, hat and shade positioning regularly to ensure s/he continues to be well protected from UV.

Sun Protection and Infants (0-12 Months):

To protect babies from solar UV, Cancer Council Australia recommends using a combination of sun protection measures whenever UV Index levels reach 3 or above as shown by the daily sun protection times.

Sun blocks are not recommended for this age group.

Plan daily activities to ensure the baby is well protected from the sun. Aim to minimise time (or take particular care) outside during the middle hours of the day during the summer period when UV levels are at their strongest. These vary depending on your location in Australia, so checking the UV index is recommended.

Children often copy those around them and learn by imitation. Research shows that if adults adopt sun protection behaviours, the children in their care are more likely to do the same.

Check the baby’s clothing, hat and shade positioning regularly to ensure s/he continues to be well protected from UV.

How You Can Prepare For Skin Cancer Check

We offer free bulk billed whole body skin cancer check in our clinic to help with early detection and treatment of skin cancers that can be life saving.

  • 1. You need to book a long appointment for skin cancer check

  • 2. You need to avoid any make-up or other creams

  • 3. As parts of examination you need to undress to expose your skin (except private area)

  • 4. If you feel more convenient you can bring a family member or ask for chaperon

  • 5. Skin examinations conducted by a doctor, using Dermoscope, but the doctor may need to feel and touch some of your skin lesion to check for roughness, attachments, adhesion, depth…

  • 6. You may need to have some procedure like freezing at time of skin check

  • 7. If you have any suspicious lesion or chaotic pigmented mole ,you may need another appointment for surgery

  • 8. You will have time to discuss with your doctor about your area of concern
CONTACT US

How You Can Prepare For Skin Cancer Check

We offer free bulk billed whole body skin cancer check in our clinic to help with early detection and treatment of skin cancers that can be life saving.

  • 1. You need to book a long appointment for skin cancer check

  • 2. You need to avoid any make-up or other creams

  • 3. As parts of examination you need to undress to expose your skin (except private area)

  • 4. If you feel more convenient you can bring a family member or ask for chaperon

  • 5. Skin examinations conducted by a doctor, using Dermoscope, but the doctor may need to feel and touch some of your skin lesion to check for roughness, attachments, adhesion, depth…

  • 6. You may need to have some procedure like freezing at time of skin check

  • 7. If you have any suspicious lesion or chaotic pigmented mole ,you may need another appointment for surgery

  • 8. You will have time to discuss with your doctor about your area of concern
CONTACT US

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Doctors & Team

Speak to our experienced and friendly staff today for more information about the service/s today.

Dr Najah Jaafar
Dr Najah Jaafar General Practitoner
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Dr Ebi Kheirandish
Dr Ebi KheirandishGeneral Practitoner
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Address: Shop 3, 29-37
George Street  Woy Woy, NSW 2256

Opening Hours

Mon – Fri / 9:00am – 5:00pm
Sat – Sun / Closed

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Contact Us

P: (02) 4313 1888
F:(02)4313 1988

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